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Tag Archives: Andrew Mitchell

Sir George Young, Bt, and the original cash for honours scandal

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So what exactly is a baronet? We need to know to understand, in these class-sensitive times, following hard on “plebgate”, whether the appointment of Sir George Young, Bart, as the UK Government’s Chief Whip upsets the delicately crafted social balance of the British Cabinet. Is Sir George a bat’s squeak more posh or a smidgin more plebeian than Hampstead-born, Rugby and Cambridge-educated ex-Army officer and former Lazards banker Andrew Mitchell?

Young is well loved as the gentlemanly bicycling baronet, his copybook slightly blotted by his witty apothegm: “The homeless are what you step over when you come out of the opera” – often quoted out of context, as here. Those were more vulgar, more Thatcherite times. The Conservative party is now, of course, intensely relaxed about the filthy poor.

But back to the baronetcy. Behind it lies a shocking tale of snobbery and social climbing, naked patronage and the original cash for honours scandal.

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Plebs row: Andrew Mitchell can’t necessarily rely on police officers’ thick skins

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So should Andrew Mitchell have been arrested and prosecuted for swearing at (or in the presence of) police outside No 10 Downing Street and allegedly calling them plebs?

Those who would love to see the stuck-up Tory toff (there, I’ve said it, and it’s on the record) doing time for his outbreak of incivility have had some difficulty finding any precedents for the offence of swearing at police officers. London Mayor, Boris Johnson, has certainly said they should be arrested, and one man is said to have been prosecuted for abusing police during the riots under Section 5 of the Public Order Act 1986 on “causing harassment, alarm and distress”.

But riots and the day-to-day hurly burly of a Cabinet minister’s life are two different things. As matters stand, the police are unlikely to arrest  people who abuse them – however irritating the odious oik might be who is doing the abusing.

And this is as it should be. To arrest people who insult the police would be a draconian power, criminalizing most ordinary people who find encounters with the police stressful, whether after a hard day of trying to keep a faltering Government on its feet or because you are young, black and you’ve been stopped and searched for the Nth time this year.

Crucially it has generally been held that the police have pretty thick skins and aren’t going to be moved to strike a man who insults them (as in “conduct likely to breach the peace” – see “Blemishing the peace” below) or feel harassment, alarm and distress – even when insulted by a here today, gone tomorrow member of Cabinet who thinks the world should jump to his every order. After all, most police are likely to hear plenty of this sort of thing – not least in their own canteens.

The case to look at is Harvey v DPP (2011) in which Denzel Harvey was one of several men being searched for cannabis. “Mr Harvey objected and said, ‘Fuck this, man, I ain’t been smoking nothing’. PC Challis told him that if he continued to swear he would be arrested for an offence under section 5 of the Public Order Act 1986. PC Challis searched the appellant but found no drugs, whereupon the appellant said, ‘Told you, you won’t find fuck all’.” Other searches proceeded and names were taken, then the officer “asked the appellant if he had a middle name and the appellant replied, ‘No, I’ve already fucking told you so’. The officer arrested Mr Harvey for the offence under section 5.” He was convicted and fined £50. Read the rest of this entry

Pleb or posh – the UK Cabinet’s class position analysed

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The  Andrew Mitchell row over the abuse allegedly hurled at police by the UK Government’s chief whip, and whether or not he called them plebs, brings the political focus back on to whether Britain is being governed by a bunch of out of touch posh boys. Here is a guide to the essential information to allow you to make up your mind. (Definitions and analysis are given below.) Included is information on the nature of Cabinet members’ work before they became MPs, which speaks to the issue of how out of touch they may or may not be.

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