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Tag Archives: Deportation

Begum judgment: a dilemma for liberals

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How awkward! For Lisa Nandy, for Labour MPs in general only just getting used to donning the Union Jack waistcoat, and for all liberal constitutionalists who are believers in the rule of law and defenders of judges from allegations of “treachery” and “activism”.

The Begum Supreme Court ruling that “Jihadi bride” Shamima Begum cannot return to Britain to fight for her British citizenship has put them in a very contorted position. These, after all, are the people who believe it is right that judges stand in judgment over the executive; that they are a bulwark against oppressive government actions. That, after all, is the “rule of law”.

Yet here is a case where the highest court in the land supported the Government against the individual, backed the Goliath against a tragic single mother seeking to assert her rights, declared, indeed, that the courts should not intervene in such government policymaking.

The position of Nandy, the shadow Foreign Secretary, epitomises the agony on the liberal left. In the past she has, in principle, backed Begum’s return, saying (according to this Labour site last July): “The law was on the side of bringing her back to the UK, because it’s not legal to deny someone a fair trial or to make them stateless.” Here, though, is what she said on BBC 4’s Any Questions in response to the Begum decision (with emphases added):

  “I suppose first of all to say we respect the court’s decision. The judgment that the Home Office put forward was that it would create national security risks for her to return to the UK to appeal against the decision to strip her of her citizenship. She wants to have that heard in the UK. The Home Office wants that to be heard remotely from the camp that she is currently in and the Supreme Court ruled with the Home Secretary essentially that this [her return] creates national security risks. We wouldn’t welcome the prospect of anyone returning to the UK who wishes us harm.”

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Home Office plays the long – and costly – game to deport 70-year-old widow

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In these straitened times the Ministry of Justice has had to crack down on the costs of the UK legal system. But there is one area where apparently money is no object: chasing 70-year-old Pakistani widows from Britain’s shores.

Even when their chums at the Home Office are on a two-year losing streak during which judges twice rejected the case for removing Razia Begum as “disproportionate” given she retains no ties in Pakistan, one last desperate (and expensive) throw of the dice was bankrolled by the public purse. 

Thus it was that Home Office lawyers fetched up at the Court of Appeal a couple of weeks ago demanding another go at removing Mrs Begum, even though they had missed an appeal deadline a year and a half ago – owing to “mere oversight”. Their claim for an extension was based on the notion that they “had a good case” against Mrs Begum.

But “the need for litigation to be conducted efficiently and at proportionate cost” is a principle of legal procedure far pre-dating current MoJ rigours. So the notion that the Home Office could, at great expense, lay out its case before two Lord Justices to persuade them it was good enough for it to proceed, then at some later point lay out the whole case again before yet more learned justices during the substantive appeal was not one likely to find favour in the Court.
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Judge criticises Home Office after failure to deport Jamaican drug dealer

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A UK Court of Appeal judge has criticised the Home Office for delays in dealing with the expulsion of a convicted Jamaican drug dealer which could increase his chance of staying in Britain. A decision to deport the man, known as KD, was made in 2007 after he served a five-year sentence for dealing in class A drugs. But failings by the Home Office mean he is still in the UK with an improved chance of remaining as time passes.

The Upper Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum) had ruled that his deportation would breach his Article 8 family rights because he had had a relationship with a British woman since 2001 and they had three children. Now Lord Justice Richards in the Court of Appeal has granted the Government a right to appeal against that judgment – but said “the passage of time is likely to strengthen rather than weaken the respondent’s Article 8 claim in the event that the matter falls to be decided afresh”.

Problems in the procedure started because the Home Office failed to serve the deportation order on KD in 2007. The Secretary of State had treated KD’s Article 8 application for leave to remain as if it was an application to revoke the non-existent deportation order – and had rejected it.
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Algerians win new round in human rights battle against deportation

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Six Algerians considered “a threat to the national security of the United Kingdom” have won a new round in a legal battle that has, in three cases, lasted nearly eight years to resist deportation on human rights grounds. The Case of BB & Others v Secretary of State for the Home Department considers how far poor treatment and physical conditions (rather than torture) in foreign detention centres lacking British standards may justify a human rights bar to deportation. The issue is about “the requisite minimum level of severity needed to breach Article 3″ (of the European Convention on Human Rights on torture and inhuman treatment).

An agreement is in place between the UK and Algeria that terrorism suspects will not be tortured or mistreated on their return. However, the Court of Appeal decided that a tribunal (SIAC) that found the Algerians could be deported had failed to give full consideration to whether their potential detention and interrogation for up to 12 days by military authorities in Algeria would itself constitute “inhuman treatment” under Article 3. 

The court also questioned whether there were adequate safeguards to verify whether the Algerian authorities were observing the assurances given to the the UK Government about treatment of deportees. The assurances included Algeria’s acceptance in the case of any deportee of “the right to respect, in any circumstances, for his human dignity”.

The Special Immigration Appeals Commission (SIAC) will now have to look at the case again and consider evidence that conditions at Antar barracks interrogation centre in Algiers, where the men would be held temporarily, are not acceptable. 

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Theresa May’s immigration rules expel the rule of law

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The UK Government has instituted a remarkable constitutional innovation that redefines the concept of the rule of law. It has declared that the Government can tell judges how to interpret legal rules governing executive actions when those actions are challenged in court.

This is the implication of guidance attached to the new Immigration Rules laid (briefly) before Parliament and coming into force on 9 July 2012.

Home Secretary Theresa May has set out new rules on immigration but, crucially, severely curbed judges’ rights to interpret those rules in the light of Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights. She has done it on the basis of a misreading – or perhaps, more accurately, a misrepresentation – of case law on the immigration issue.

Since the Immigration Rules are not statutory (they are issued by the Government rather than passing through the full legislative process in Parliament) they can be struck down by courts if not in conformity with the European Convention. Article 8(1) says: “Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence.” It is blamed by the government for preventing the deportation of undesirables, including criminals or potential terrorists, if they can claim a “family life” in Britain. This has irritated the current and previous Governments for years.

Notoriously, even the fact that a foreign man and his British girlfriend co-own a cat was once adduced to enhance a non-national’s “family life” credentials under Article 8 – at least according to Mrs May. Read the rest of this entry

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