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Tag Archives: High Court

Can Sir Philip Green suppress media interest in his ‘banter’?

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So it was just banter. That is how British entrepreneur Sir Philip Green is defending his behaviour towards employees – and presumably defending his right to keep his behaviour secret with the full weight of a permanent High Court injunction. But hasn’t his statement to the Mail on Sunday (“There has obviously from time to time been some banter, but as far as I’m concerned that’s never been offensive”) rather undermined his case for such an injunction?

The essence of the case is that his behaviour, as covered by non-disclosure agreements with alleged victims, is a private matter. It comes within the English Common Law “equitable doctrine of confidence”, that is to say confidentiality, particularly applicable to the relationship between employer and employee. “The doctrine serves the public interest by encouraging trust, candour and good faith in legal relationships,” as Mr Justice Haddon-Cave expressed it in the original High Court injunction case (which Green and two associated companies lost).

One has to ask, of course, whether Sir Philip’s “banter”, was likely to encourage “trust, candour and good faith” with his employees. He insists: “I’ve got a good relationship with all my staff” – though some would seem to disagree. But the legal point is that Green and his lawyers have to establish the issue as one of confidentiality/privacy since that is the only way they can exercise power over the media to bar publication. This is the reason for his rather carefully worded (and hence rather odd) statement when his name was revealed in the House of Lords by Peter Hain:

“to the extent that it is suggested that I have been guilty of unlawful sexual or racist behaviour, I categorically and wholly deny these allegations”.   

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(Alleged) torturers welcome to Britain – just pick up your certificate of immunity

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The lives of high profile war criminals, torturers and despots have just got a little easier. No longer need they strike Britain off the list of destinations when they fancy a foreign jolly out of fear that some officious busybody will spoil their fun by having them arrested for their crimes.

All they have to do is get the Foreign Office to declare them on a “special mission” and they become untouchable. They have immunity, not because the UK Parliament has given them immunity through a statute fully debated and passed by MPs and Peers. Instead a couple of High Court judges have declared they have immunity as part of English Common Law. As such immunity for those on special missions has always been the law.*

The High Court case was prompted by a visit to Britain by Lieut General Mahmoud Hegazy, the director of the Egyptian Military Intelligence Service blamed for the “atrocities” that arose from the crushing of a demonstrators opposing the coup against Mohamed Morsi in July 2013. Hegazy came to Britain in 2015 to meet government ministers, but part of his “official” mission was a visit to a London arms fair, according to the Guardian.

On the face of it the judgment (R (Freedom and Justice Party) v the Foreign Office) – in favour of the Foreign Office position – flies in the face of the Government’s insistence in 2013 that it had the “firm policy of ending impunity for the most serious international crimes and a commitment to the protection of human rights”. On the other hand it does get the Government and state agents such as the police and Director of Public Prosecutions off an embarrassing hook when a torturer or despot comes calling on “official” business.

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Bad for bees: FoE loses neonicotinoid pesticide case

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Environmental group Friends of the Earth (FoE) has failed in its UK High Court attempt to stop the emergency use of banned neonicotinoid pesticides, implicated in the decline of bee populations.

The use of three neonicotinoid pesticides is illegal under European Union law, though the law is due to be reviewed. The UK Department for Environment (DEFRA) authorised use of two of the pesticides for 120 days on about 5% of England’s oil seed rape crop after the National Farmers Union had made an application for their emergency use over the autumn.

The Hon Mrs Justice Patterson has now rejected an FoE challenge to the authorisation for the pesticides Modesto and Cruiser OSR, which contain neonicotinoids. In seeking a judicial review FoE claimed it had arguable cases that:

i) the UK Government did not give proper consideration to whether the risk to oilseed rape on the farms constituted an emergency;
ii) that no consideration was given to whether the risk could be contained by other means;
iii) that there was no compliance with the requirement that the authorisation should be limited and controlled.
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Joy v Joy-Morancho divorce case: not just about the Bentley

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For the press it is all about the cars – particularly the £470,000 vintage Bentley that Nichola Joy sought to have seized from her ex-husband Clive Joy-Morancho to pay towards her legal costs in their multimillion-pound divorce proceedings.

In the latest hearing, according to the national press, Mrs Joy “lost” that battle (Businessman wins divorce spat over vintage cars: Telegraph) but the truth is rather more complex. In particular High Court judge, Sir Peter Singer, made clear his dissatisfaction with Mr Joy-Morancho’s case (a fact that went unreported by the press), calling it a “sham, a charade, bogus, spurious and contrived” – and possibly even a fraud.

Mrs Joy does not avoid a tongue lashing, either. “What she says must be subjected to close scrutiny and approached with a degree of scepticism having regard to the many extravagant and often inconsistent observations to which she committed herself.”

For judges involved in this long-running (and continuing) case it must have something of the feel of a sophisticated whodunnit involving tens of millions in assets. Whose are they? Where are they? Is anyone wilfully hiding them? For others it’s a moral tale as the super-rich and their cash are sucked into the dark vortex that is a tax-efficient financial trust. As such, the papers’ reports have missed the real story. Read the rest of this entry

AA v Southwark – a conspiracy to evict ‘whether lawfully or not’

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A British High Court judge has accused officers at Southwark Council, London, of conspiracy to cause harm to a council tenant by unlawfully destroying his possessions and an illegal eviction. The council has been forced to compensate the tenant, AA, left street-homeless without income or possessions by the eviction, for an unknown sum. AA’s original claim was for £2.4m.

The judge, Anthony Thornton QC, in AA v London Borough of Southwark, said council officers were determined to secure the eviction “whether it was lawful or not”. As a result officers and the council itself were liable for misfeasance in public office. “They had limited prospects of evicting him lawfully and they therefore appear to have embarked on an eviction with the intention of evicting AA even though this could not be done lawfully.”

The entire contents of AA’s flat in Peckham, including his passport, laptops, papers, personal belongings and furniture were removed and illegally destroyed in a refuse disposal facility. The court heard that AA had made repeated attempts in the High Court and County Court to regain possession of his flat and to regain his belongings and also tried to discuss his predicament with council officials. As a result of his eviction he was street homeless for more than a year except for the use of a sofa or floor space in  friends homes for part of the time. His only income was financial assistance from those friends.

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Court wrangle for Drax over renewable energy subsidy

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Note: since this piece was posted DECC has won its appeal against Drax (7 August 2014) and the power generator has abandoned further legal action (with its share price duly dropping). See “The Court of Appeal judgment” below.

Shares in UK energy company Drax leapt more than 40p after it won a High Court victory against the Department of Energy  and Climate Change (DECC) over renewable energy subsidies (14 July 2014). It is the second court win against DECC mishandling of the green energy business sector announced within days. (See previous post)

DECC had failed to accept one of Drax’s biomass conversion projects as eligible for a subsidy scheme involving contracts for difference (CfDs), intended to provide certainty on prices for renewable generation.

Mrs Justice Andrews ruled that: “When properly understood, Drax’s application did satisfy the Key Criterion [for the CfD subsidy] and no decision maker, properly informed, who accepted that Drax was telling the truth …  could have concluded that it had failed to do so or that the information given by Drax was insufficient to satisfy him that it passed the test.” She added: “The matter will have to be remitted to DECC for reconsideration in the light of this judgment.”

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Contractual rights are property rights: Government blunder on feed-in tariffs

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The UK Government faces a bill for up to £200m in compensation to green energy installers that suffered losses as a result of former energy secretary Chris Huhne’s 2011 announcement on proposed cuts in environmental subsidies. The announcement led to many organisations and individuals dropping plans to install solar power with feed-in tariff (FIT) equipment that feeds electricity generated by small-scale solar panel systems into the grid, producing a payment.

A legal ruling in the High Court (Breyer Group plc & Others v DECC issued 9 July 2014 ) is the second time in a week that the government has been show to have fallen foul of the principle that the law should not be retrospectively changed if it damages people’s interests. (See the Poundland case: UK Human Rights Blog)

Are contracts property?
The High Court established in its ruling on preliminary legal issues that pre-existing contracts to supply the solar micro-generation equipment constitute “property” for the purposes of protection of property rights under the European Convention on Human Rights. Furthermore, Huhne’s announcement, which proposed bringing forward a reduction of the subsidised payment, constituted an “interference” with those property rights. This should potentially be compensated, said Mr Justice Coulson.

The 31 October 2011 announcement that cuts in the feed-in payment might be brought forward amounted to a retrospective change in legislation without passing new legislation through Parliament. “The proposal would have taken away existing entitlements without statutory authority.” The announcement damaged businesses and hit consumers who had planned to install the equipment on the basis of the higher payments. As such it breached ECHR Article 1 Protocol 1 (A1P1) on protection of property rights regarding contracts concluded on or before the day of the announcement.

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Schedule 7: High Court rejects Sylvie Beghal human rights case

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Note: A European Court of Human Rights judgment has now (February 2019) declared a violation in this case. See below Beghal v UK.

The British High Court has called for a legislative change to “Schedule 7” terrorism powers under which David Miranda, partner of Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald, was held for questioning.

However, the judge has ruled that the Schedule 7 regime is legally acceptable and that Sylvie Beghal, held under Schedule 7, did not have her right to liberty under European Convention law breached. Nor was her right to a private life breached by the obligation under Schedule 7 to answer any questions put by security officers – however personal.

Lord Justice Gross in his conclusion said: “In short, the balance struck between individual rights and the public interest in protection against terrorism does not violate the fundamental human rights in question.”

The judges recommended the law be changed to bar the use of admissions gained at a Schedule 7 questioning being used against the individual at any subsequent criminal trial. Schedule 7 questioning is not accompanied by the usual protections for suspects including the (qualified) right to silence and the absolute right to a lawyer. Read the rest of this entry

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