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Tag Archives: Terrorism

Begum judgment: a dilemma for liberals

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How awkward! For Lisa Nandy, for Labour MPs in general only just getting used to donning the Union Jack waistcoat, and for all liberal constitutionalists who are believers in the rule of law and defenders of judges from allegations of “treachery” and “activism”.

The Begum Supreme Court ruling that “Jihadi bride” Shamima Begum cannot return to Britain to fight for her British citizenship has put them in a very contorted position. These, after all, are the people who believe it is right that judges stand in judgment over the executive; that they are a bulwark against oppressive government actions. That, after all, is the “rule of law”.

Yet here is a case where the highest court in the land supported the Government against the individual, backed the Goliath against a tragic single mother seeking to assert her rights, declared, indeed, that the courts should not intervene in such government policymaking.

The position of Nandy, the shadow Foreign Secretary, epitomises the agony on the liberal left. In the past she has, in principle, backed Begum’s return, saying (according to this Labour site last July): “The law was on the side of bringing her back to the UK, because it’s not legal to deny someone a fair trial or to make them stateless.” Here, though, is what she said on BBC 4’s Any Questions in response to the Begum decision (with emphases added):

  “I suppose first of all to say we respect the court’s decision. The judgment that the Home Office put forward was that it would create national security risks for her to return to the UK to appeal against the decision to strip her of her citizenship. She wants to have that heard in the UK. The Home Office wants that to be heard remotely from the camp that she is currently in and the Supreme Court ruled with the Home Secretary essentially that this [her return] creates national security risks. We wouldn’t welcome the prospect of anyone returning to the UK who wishes us harm.”

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Algerians win new round in human rights battle against deportation

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Six Algerians considered “a threat to the national security of the United Kingdom” have won a new round in a legal battle that has, in three cases, lasted nearly eight years to resist deportation on human rights grounds. The Case of BB & Others v Secretary of State for the Home Department considers how far poor treatment and physical conditions (rather than torture) in foreign detention centres lacking British standards may justify a human rights bar to deportation. The issue is about “the requisite minimum level of severity needed to breach Article 3″ (of the European Convention on Human Rights on torture and inhuman treatment).

An agreement is in place between the UK and Algeria that terrorism suspects will not be tortured or mistreated on their return. However, the Court of Appeal decided that a tribunal (SIAC) that found the Algerians could be deported had failed to give full consideration to whether their potential detention and interrogation for up to 12 days by military authorities in Algeria would itself constitute “inhuman treatment” under Article 3. 

The court also questioned whether there were adequate safeguards to verify whether the Algerian authorities were observing the assurances given to the the UK Government about treatment of deportees. The assurances included Algeria’s acceptance in the case of any deportee of “the right to respect, in any circumstances, for his human dignity”.

The Special Immigration Appeals Commission (SIAC) will now have to look at the case again and consider evidence that conditions at Antar barracks interrogation centre in Algiers, where the men would be held temporarily, are not acceptable. 

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Schedule 7: High Court rejects Sylvie Beghal human rights case

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Note: A European Court of Human Rights judgment has now (February 2019) declared a violation in this case. See below Beghal v UK.

The British High Court has called for a legislative change to “Schedule 7” terrorism powers under which David Miranda, partner of Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald, was held for questioning.

However, the judge has ruled that the Schedule 7 regime is legally acceptable and that Sylvie Beghal, held under Schedule 7, did not have her right to liberty under European Convention law breached. Nor was her right to a private life breached by the obligation under Schedule 7 to answer any questions put by security officers – however personal.

Lord Justice Gross in his conclusion said: “In short, the balance struck between individual rights and the public interest in protection against terrorism does not violate the fundamental human rights in question.”

The judges recommended the law be changed to bar the use of admissions gained at a Schedule 7 questioning being used against the individual at any subsequent criminal trial. Schedule 7 questioning is not accompanied by the usual protections for suspects including the (qualified) right to silence and the absolute right to a lawyer. Read the rest of this entry

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