RSS Feed

Tag Archives: UK constitution

We need a judicial review into who’s killing JR

Posted on

Here’s a riddle wrapped up in a paradox: could judges using the power of judicial review strike down David Cameron’s attempts to curb the use of judicial review?

The British Prime Minister has complained at people exercising their right to hold the executive to account. He wants to “reduce the time limit when people can bring cases; charge more for reviews – so people think twice about time-wasting”.

Now let us remind ourselves of the chilling threat issued by Baron Steyn, of Swafield in the County of Norfolk. In R (Jackson) v Attorney General (House of Lords case 2006) he said on the supremacy of Parliament:

The judges created this principle. If that is so, it is not unthinkable that circumstances could arise where the courts may have to qualify a principle established on a different hypothesis of constitutionalism. In exceptional circumstances involving an attempt to abolish judicial review or the ordinary role of the courts, the Appellate Committee of the House of Lords or a new Supreme Court may have to consider whether this is a constitutional fundamental which even a sovereign Parliament acting at the behest of a complaisant House of Commons cannot abolish.”

He is saying that if Parliament sought to abolish judicial review, courts would have to defy Parliament even though Parliament is sovereign. The rationale for his position is that there exists in Britain the rule of law. You know the one: the rule that says the Government is subject to the law, just like everyone else. The one the Government, and particularly the Prime Minister, David Cameron, keeps forgetting.

Read the rest of this entry

Theresa May’s immigration rules expel the rule of law

Posted on

The UK Government has instituted a remarkable constitutional innovation that redefines the concept of the rule of law. It has declared that the Government can tell judges how to interpret legal rules governing executive actions when those actions are challenged in court.

This is the implication of guidance attached to the new Immigration Rules laid (briefly) before Parliament and coming into force on 9 July 2012.

Home Secretary Theresa May has set out new rules on immigration but, crucially, severely curbed judges’ rights to interpret those rules in the light of Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights. She has done it on the basis of a misreading – or perhaps, more accurately, a misrepresentation – of case law on the immigration issue.

Since the Immigration Rules are not statutory (they are issued by the Government rather than passing through the full legislative process in Parliament) they can be struck down by courts if not in conformity with the European Convention. Article 8(1) says: “Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence.” It is blamed by the government for preventing the deportation of undesirables, including criminals or potential terrorists, if they can claim a “family life” in Britain. This has irritated the current and previous Governments for years.

Notoriously, even the fact that a foreign man and his British girlfriend co-own a cat was once adduced to enhance a non-national’s “family life” credentials under Article 8 – at least according to Mrs May. Read the rest of this entry

%d bloggers like this: